Fanboy News Network Episode 34

 

Fanboy News Network Episode 34

“2015 in Review”

Before starting the 2015 review Jeff and Daniel talk about the recent loss of David Bowie and Alan Rickman.

Jeff and Daniel tackle the question which was better: Mad Max: Fury Road or Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

They also discuss the contributions of Margaret Sixel to Fury Road and Marcia Lucas to Star Wars.

Jeff talks about Kathleen Kennedy, her legacy, and why she is the perfect choice to now run Lucasfilm.

The boys talk about the other films they like this year.

Jeff talks about the best horror films. For more, listen to Don’t Read the Latin Ep. 35

The rise of Netflix as a major player in original programming.

Talk about the super hero series and what is going well and what needs to be better.

A look back at the year that was in conventions.

Jeff wants to know why Greg Land still gets work.

Looking at the comics industry and why Marvel is eating DC’s lunch.

Daniel gives a shout out to his favorite podcasts.

Daniel explains why he likes doing the podcast.

Fanboy News Network Episode 33

“Hello From the Past”

So Jeff and Daniel recorded this before the release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens. So they talk about their anticipation of the movie.

Dicussion of other upcoming movies including X-Men:Apocalypse, and Star Trek: Beyond,

Talking about white washing in upcoming movies, Including Gods Of Eygpt and the Forest.

Jeff and Daniel talk about their anticipation of He Never Died and their love of its star Henry Rollins.

Jeff talks about the big reveal on Supergirl and how it made his nerd heart soar. (Two Weeks later after the TV reveal, so spoilers abound)

Back to Star Wars and the state of the Expanded Universe.

Talk of the state of the comic industry and the current market share and why this is not the best news for DC.

Jeff and Daniel discuss what they are reading as usual.

Another discussion of Wolf 359 now that Jeff has listened to the whole series.

Fanboy News Network Episode 32

“When Movie Trailers attack”

Jeff and Daniel dissect the new Batman v Superman trailer.
Discussion about their hopes for Star Wars VII
Jeff talks about Jessica Jones and Daniel explains why it is not for him.
Discussion of the current crop of comic related shows and where they are at this point of the season. This includes Agents of SHEILD, Gotham, Flash, Arrow, and Supergirl.
Why female led genre shows are not a zero some game.
Jeff’s mad scheme to promote more female superhero toys.
Daniel talks about the Podcast Wolf 359
The regular book update.
the MST3K revival

Fanboy News Network Episode 31

“Your Convention is Problematic”

Jeff and Daniel discuss World Fantasy Con, both its harassment Policy, and the change to its award.

Review: EOS 10

EOS 10 Promo

In my effort to create a scripted podcast, I decided one of the best things I could do is go and find other scripted podcasts to listen to. In this pursuit, I came across EOS 10.

EOS 10 is a podcast created by Justin McLachlan. The title is the name of the space station where the show is set. The premise is that the chief medical officer on the station, Dr Horace Urvidian (Dan Berry) has become an alcoholic. Since Urvidian is a well-known figure in the Alliance (with a children’s book written about him.) his failure would be an embarrassment. To head this off, Dr. Ryan Dalias (McLachlan) is assigned to be his new chief of surgery. Ryan, the son of an admiral with a history with Urvidian, has experience with substance abuse, and convinces Urvidian to go sober.

In addition to the two doctors, the medical staff also includes Nurse Jane Johns (Natalie Cutcher), a snarky extrovert who likely became that way to survive Urvidian. She also pines for Dr. Osolong, a staff member who is mentioned but never appears, and also happens to be gay.

Rounding out the main cast is Levi (Charles Lipper), a deposed alien prince who now works at the station cafeteria. Levi is friendly, but a hypochondriac, hence his constant interaction with the medical staff. Levi is also not above going outside the law if he wants something.

This last trait puts the crew in contact with the recurring character Akmazian (Tim Torre). Akmazian is wanted by the Alliance as a terrorist, and has been hiding out in an unused section of the base. Akmazian claims to have been framed and tries to be helpful when he can, to get the crew, especially Ryan, on his side.

The only other recurring character of note is the Quarter Master (Chris Stinson), a two headed alien who for reasons unknown dislikes Ryan.

As there is no narrator, EOS 10 has to find ways to convey locations and situations while not resorting to the dreaded “as you know” trope. Fortunately, the writing is up to the task. It is helped along by being a clear pastiche of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, at least in set up. This fills in a lot of blanks in the back story.

One thing the show does very well is create a sense of space. This is from small things like background noise. All scenes on the station have a particular background hum. Scenes in the cafeteria have the sounds of people chatting and plates clinking. But there are other sound effects used to tell the story, like having the Quarter Master’s voice alternate between speakers to show which head is currently talking.

The story itself covers a few themes. One is dealing with addiction of course, as shown through Urvidian and Ryan and their straight forward cases, but also in things like Jane dealing with her obsession with a man that will never notice her, and Levi pining for his past life as a royal.

There is also a government conspiracy plot, thanks to interaction with Akmazian that slow burns in season one, and comes to the forefront in season two. The show also tackles other issues, such as the episode Antivaxx which, as the title suggests, deals with the anti-vaccination movement.

On the acting front the show does well, pulling it’s cast from actors working in the Washington D.C. area. They all do fine work, but Dan Berry and Charles Lipper stand out as Urvidian and Levi. McLachlan does a good job as Ryan, but at times he can come off as a bit too relaxed.

If you are looking for a podcast that tells an interesting story without being too heavy, I would suggest checking EOS 10 out. So far, two seasons have been released consisting of eight episodes each.

I give EOS 10 a grade of B. It should entertain Science Fiction fans looking for a podcast, but might leave some people behind.

Fanboy News Network Episode 30

“Halloween Wrap Up with Jillian Venters”
Jillian steps in as guest co-host to cover various Halloween events.
Jeff and Jill take another look at Convention staffs behaving badly.
Jill tells of her Halloween event trip to California Including:
  • Halloween Horror Nights
  • Mickey’s not so Scary Halloween
  • Wicked Lit
Jeff and Jill give their thoughts on Crimson Peak
Jillian explains her obession with 1970s Gothic Satanic Romance novels.
Jillian’s tips for Halloween.
Jillian explains Lolita culture for Daniel

Horror Review: Let Us Prey

Let-Us-Prey-3

Let Us Prey is an interesting film to review. On the surface it seems like a very generic horror film but, as it is with events in the film itself, looks can be deceiving.

Let Us Prey is set in a small, out of the way, Scottish town. Its police force consists of four officers; one of those officers, Rachel (Pollyanna McIntosh), is literally heading in for her first shift with the department when she witness a car hit a pedestrian. The driver, Caesar (Brian Vernal), stops and she arrests him, but the victim is nowhere to be found.

After getting back to the station ,she meets her commanding officer, Sgt. McReady (Douglas Russel), who seems intent on keeping the status quo and isn’t very warm to having Rachel in his department. Her fellow officers, Jack (Brian Larkin) and Jennifer (Hanna Stanbridge), are having an affair and seem to be pretty clearly corrupt.

Besides Caesar the police are also holding Ralph (Jonathan Watson), who is being held for domestic abuse, and not for the first time. Things get complicated when the man Caesar hit (Liam Cunningham) shows up at the station, battered, but apparently alright. After having Dr. Hume (Niall Gregg Fulton) examine the man, the Sargent decides to put the man in cell six, in part due to his refusal to identify himself, thus the character is referred to as simply Six.

After this, odd things start happening around the station. It becomes increasingly clear that Six is manipulating events and that each person in that station is not there by chance. It is up to Rachel, who has vague memories of meeting Six as a child, to figure out what is going on.

As I said at the top, Let Us Prey starts out as a very standard horror movie, with the introduction of the victims and then the slow thinning of the cast. What makes it stand out is that, as the plot unfolds, it starts playing with our expectations. Writers David Caims and Fiona Watson know who their audience is, and what they have come to expect, and use that knowledge to take the story to places that play with those expectations.

Director Brian O’Malley keeps the pace slow, but never dragging. When he does pick up the pace at the ending, he remembers that this is a horror film and not an action movie. The mood is also aided by the lighting, often coming off as if the whole movie is lit by the halogens in the station.

For the actors, this is clearly Cunningham’s film. Being the most recognizable of the cast (from his role as Davos Seaworth, the onion knight on Game of Thrones) Cunningham carries the film as the enigmatic Six. As the story moves on it becomes clear to the audience who Six is supposed to be, but the movie never comes out and confirms anything.

McIntosh manages to hold her own with Cunningham, as the film’s protagonist. Rachel’s history, showing she was kidnapped by a child murderer when she was a young girl, leads to a character who is determined to help others, but dealing with her own darkness from the event. All this leads to the final scene of the movie;  without giving away spoilers, it is unexpected, but McIntosh’s performance makes it stand out as a triumphant moment, where it could have easily fallen flat.

The rest of the cast is fine, but no one really stands out. They just play as figures in the game between Six and Rachel.

I give Let Us Prey a grade of B. Horror fans should enjoy the mood and how it plays with genre tropes, non-fans should still like it, but may be thrown by twists.

If you want to check it out, Let Us Prey is currently available on Netflix.

Fanboy News Network Episode 29

Fanboy News Network Episode 29

“Horror Month and more”
Jeff talks about the Podcast “The Black Tapes Podcast”
Dicussion of They Live and how well it has aged.
Recommendations for good short horror on YouTube.
Jeff talks about attending Geek Girl Con.
News from NYCC
The flopping of the movie Pan and why this made Jeff and Daniel happy.
How the geek community came together to support Ahmed Mohamed.
Daniel talks about why he enjoyned the Martian and Jeff talks about why he is looking forward to Crimson Peak.
Daniel talks about reading the Fight Club II comic and his decision to buy the first issue of Dark Knight 3.
Jeff talks about his impression of the returning comic book inspired TV shows.
Discussion of the post-Secret Wars Spider-Man stories.
Daniel talks about the novel Ancillary Justice.
A quick plug at the end for the Kickstarter for Thea Maia and Jillian Venters Adult and kids coloring books.

Horror Review: Sapphire and Steel

sapphire_steel_0

Sapphire and Steel has been getting some buzz amongst fandom lately. Neil Cross, the creator of the BBC series Luther has stated that he wants to do a revival of Sapphire and Steel as his next project.

For those of us who were getting into British Sci-fi shows in the 80s, this is an exciting prospect; however, I’m sure a lot of you have no idea what I am talking about.

So what is Sapphire and Steel and why are some of us excited about a reboot?

Doctor Who, Blake’s 7, and Sapphire and Steel were considered the holy trinity of British Science Fiction in the 80’s. Which is interesting because I, personally, don’t consider it Science Fiction; I think of it as horror. Sapphire and Steel is a British TV series created and written exclusively by Peter J. Hammond that aired from 1979 to 1982. It was broadcast on ITV, which was a commercial network in Britain that was often the main alternative to the BBC.

The premise of the series is that if a breach in the fabric of time occurs, other worldly operatives are dispatched to fix the situation before malignant forces from outside of time can take advantage of it.

Most of our knowledge of the operatives comes from the opening narration of each episode:

“All irregularities will be handled by the forces controlling each dimension. Transuranic heavy elements may not be used where there is life. Medium atomic weights are available: Gold, Lead, Copper, Jet, Diamond, Radium, Sapphire, Silver and Steel.

Sapphire and Steel have been assigned.”

It is implied that this corresponds to the periodic table, but since none of the named operatives are named after elements we cannot be sure.

The series follows operatives Sapphire (Joanna Lumley) and Steel (David McCallum) as they investigate the breaches in time and work to correct them. The two are clearly not of this world. They can communicate with each other telepathically. Sapphire can manipulate time in a limited fashion, rolling it back, as well as having psychometry. Steel is super strong, has limited telekinesis, and in one episode was able to lower his temperature to near absolute zero to defeat a threat, but at the cost of weakening himself. In personality, Steel is cold and a bit rough in his dealings with humans, as opposed to Sapphire who is warmer, although this is implied to be a learned skill when Steel calls her a diplomat.

The time breaches are often caused by some anachronism in the area. An old nursery rhyme book, a party exactly recreating the 1930s, and a doctored photo mixing old and new elements. Once a breach has happened, Sapphire and Steel are dispatched and have to figure out why it happened, what it unleashed, and how to fix it.

Occasionally, in the course of an assignment a third operative will be sent in. The two other operatives we meet are Lead (Val Pringle), a jovial giant who can insulate Steel against the weakening effect of lowering his body temperature, and Silver, a technician who can transmute small bits of matter and can manipulate technology.

One of the features of the series that made it stand out (and makes it excellent horror) is that Sapphire and Steel’s main goal is sealing the breach. While they will attempt to save the humans caught up in it, this is a secondary goal and if letting a human die will ensure the breach is sealed, they will let the human die.

Since the series was on ITV it had what could kindly be considered a micro budget. Consider that Sapphire and Steel’s run was during the end of Tom Baker’s run on Doctor Who and the first year of Peter Davidson’s. People joke about the cheap effects of that era. Now consider that to Sapphire and Steel, Doctor Who’s budget would seem lavish. For most shows this would have been a problem, but Sapphire and Steel turned it into an advantage. Since each episode had limited sets, it was simply that during a breach no one could get out, which was usually Sapphire’s doing. The writing was also very good and made the episodes slow, but well-paced. Tension was built to the point that a pool of light on the ground, clearly created by a stage hand with a flash light, was nonetheless absolutely terrifying.

And then there was the acting. Joanna Lumley and David McCallum were already established when the series was made (Lumley from the New Avengers and McCallum from the Man From U.N.C.L.E.), but still years away from their bigger successes (Absolutely Fabulous and NCIS). In Sapphire and Steel they convey the otherworldliness of the characters and make them sympathetic even when having to make the hard choices their jobs require.

Sapphire and Steel was a serialized program, just as the original run of Doctor Who was. In all there were only six stories made, ranging from an hour and a half to three hours, depending on how many half hour segments each story required.

Be warned that some of the episodes can be very scary. One person online once said a story can go from “give me a break” to “Someone please hold me” with very little warning. And it is famous in fandom for having a downer ending in the final episode.

If you decide you want to seek out the series you are in luck. Shout Factory did a rerelease of the series in 2013. You can go to their site to find it, and the series is available from Amazon for about $26.00 as of this writing.

I am going to give Sapphire and Steel a B. I think horror fans who give it a chance will be pleasantly surprised, but I can see where the slow pacing and cheap effects could detract from others enjoying it.

Fanboy News Network Episode 28

Fanboy News Network Episode 28
“Viva Santo”
Jeff and guest co-host Rich Redman kick off the October Horror theme month with a look at the Santo Movies, featuring real life wrestler El Santo fighting monsters.